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Probate

The Court Process

Probate is a court-supervised process for identifying and gathering the assets of a deceased person (decedent), paying the decedent’s debts, and distributing the decedent’s assets to his or her beneficiaries. The Florida Probate Code is found in Chapters 731 through 735 of the Florida Statutes, and the rules governing Florida probate proceedings are found in the Florida Probate Rules, Part I and Part II (Rules 5.010-5.530).

There are two types of probate administration under Florida law: formal administration and summary administration. There is also a non-court supervised administration proceeding called "Disposition of Personal Property Without Administration." This type of administration only applies in limited circumstances. Probate administration only applies to probate assets. Probate assets are those assets that the decedent owned in his or her sole name at death, or that were owned by the decedent and one or more co-owners and lacked a provision for automatic succession of ownership at death.

Probate assets include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • A bank account or investment account in the sole name of a decedent.
  • A life insurance policy, annuity contract, or individual retirement account payable to the decedent's estate.
  • Real estate titled in the sole name of the decedent, or in the name of the decedent and another person as tenants in common, is a probate asset (unless it is homestead property).


Probate is necessary to pass ownership of the decedent’s probate assets to the decedent’s beneficiaries, if the decedent did not have a will. Probate is also necessary to complete the decedent’s financial affairs after his or her death. Administration of the decedent’s estate ensures that the decedent’s creditors are paid if certain procedures are correctly followed.

Probate proceedings are filed with the clerk of the circuit court, usually in the county in which the decedent lived at the time of his or her death. A filing fee is required and should be paid to the clerk. After you file for probate, the clerk then assigns a file number and maintains an ongoing record of all papers filed with the clerk for the administration of the decedent’s probate estate.

 

Educational Videos

These videos are available as an alternative to the text descriptions above. The videos attempt to provide information on common issues that self-represented people have in probate cases. Please note that these videos are not legal advice, and cannot be relied upon as such. If you have questions about this video or about the probate case process that are not answered by these videos, please consult an attorney.

The Probate Case Process



 

 

Forms Relating to an Probate Action

There are a number of forms that can relate to an probate action. The forms below are those that are required for court action in a probate case. If you have any questions about which form you need, please contact a lawyer.

 

Probate Forms

The Florida Supreme Court Self-Help Center does not provide any forms related to the Probate process. For more information regarding Probate forms, please see the Florida Probate Code (Chapters 731 through 735 of the Florida Statutes), and the links provided below.

The Florida Statutes


Center for Elders and the Courts


Florida Bar Consumer Pamphlet on Probate


Florida Probate Rules of Court Procedure


 

Additional Resources

The following is a list of additional resources that may be helpful in self-help cases.

  • Alternative Dispute Resolution Handbook PDF
  • Certified/Qualified Interpreter Search Information
  • Certified Translator Assistance Website
  • Family Court managers and Trial Court Managers Spreadsheet
  • Florida Bar Lawyer Referral Program Webpage
  • Legal Aid/Legal Services in Florida List

 

Locations

For locations of courthouses, clerks' offices, or legal assistance programs in each circuit/county in Florida, please refer to the State Map below. Identify the circuit in which your case will be filed and click on the blue circuit link below to see locations that may be important to you.

The State of Florida Map of Judicial Circuits

florida map with links to all 20 circuit courts

Directory (With Associated Counties)

 

 

 First Circuit
(Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton)

 

Eleventh Circuit
(Miami-Dade)

 

Second Circuit 
(Leon, Franklin, Jefferson, Liberty, Gadsden, Wakulla)

 

Twelfth Circuit
(DeSoto, Manatee, Sarasota)

 

Third Circuit
(Columbia, Madison, Hamilton, Taylor, Lafayette, Suwanee, Dixie)

 

Thirteenth Circuit
(Hillsborough)

 

Fourth Circuit
(Duval, Clay, Nassau)

 

Fourteenth Circuit
(Bay, Holmes, Jackson, Washington, Calhoun, Gulf)

 

Fifth Circuit
(Hernando, Citrus, Marion, 
Lake, Sumter)

 

Fifteenth Circuit
(Palm Beach)

 

Sixth Circuit
(Pinellas, Pasco)

 

Sixteenth Circuit
(Monroe)

 

Seventh Circuit
(St. John's, Volusia, Putnam, Flagler)

 

Seventeenth Circuit
(Broward)

 

Eight Circuit
(Alachua, Baker, Union, Bradford, Gilchrist, Levy)

 

Eighteenth Circuit
(Seminole, Brevard)

 

Ninth Circuit
(Orange, Osceola)

 

Nineteenth Circuit
(St. Lucie, Martin, Okeechobee, Indian River)

 

 Tenth Circuit
(Polk, Hardee, Highlands)

 

Twentieth Circuit
(Charlotte, Lee, Glades, Hendry, Collier)